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Help Your Horse Learn to Love his Ice Horse Time!

Help Your Horse Learn to Love his Ice Horse Time!

November 03, 2021 |

How to Train Your Horse to Love His Ice Therapy! It’s true that most horses are absolutely fine with ice therapy! After all, we have trained them to get into trailers, jump over things with us on their backs, do fancy things with their feet in front of judges, and wear all sorts of things like saddles and blankets. So if you have a horse that seems to object to his ice therapy, here are some tips to make things more positive for everyone. Don’t start with buckets. Horses know that buckets are supposed to contain FOOD - not ice! Skip the buckets and go for something that doesn’t require you need an ice machine, a hose, a bucket, and enough patience to keep refilling it after every spill. Baby steps. Teach your horse that only positive rewards happen when he wears boots or polo wraps. Lots of praise after you put them on. You will find that after a while, this is part of his life and he’s ok with it. Then use this to transfer to ice wraps after his exercise. At first, use the wraps empty. Then lots of praise, some more praise, and then even more. Do this for days or weeks until he is totally chill in his wraps. The baby steps continue. Then add in some ice packs - but the defrosted kind. Again, so much praise. Do this for days or weeks. Then baby steps continue some more. Then add the First Ice packs to the wraps - nice and cold! Don’t stop with the praise. Some other ideas to help your horse LOVE his icing time. - Let him eat! A strategically hung hay net in the cross ties is a fantastic way for him to pass the time. - Let all of his favorite massage spots be worked on. Nothing like helping your horse feel better with a nice massaging and groom after a workout. Just add in the ice wraps and it’s a two for one horse special. - Make sure he is not super distracted by lunch time happening without him, the horse eating tractor loading hay outside the barn, the invisible horse eating monster in the corner. - Braid his mane. Many horses love to be braided, and it can put them into a sort of trance. Bonus that you get to practice braiding. Any other activity that your horse loves! Combine that with his ice time and you have a happy and healthy partner!

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7 Unusual Facts About Laminitis

7 Unusual Facts About Laminitis

November 01, 2021 |

7 Unusual Facts About Laminitis Laminitis is the most dreaded of all horse conditions - it produces intense pain with often long lasting and tragic results. While we do know a lot about the causes of laminitis and ways to help the horse with laminitis, we also have some amazing little tidbits of information that might just help your horse avoid laminitis all together. Black walnut trees contain toxins that cause laminitis. A horse standing on black walnut shavings absorbs the toxins rapidly through the hoof wall. Butternut trees are also a laminitis inducing tree. Your horse’s resting hear rate will increase ever so slightly by about 5 beats per minute. This happens a few days before lameness sets in. We all know that horse hooves will heat up when the laminitis starts to set in, but did you know that the hooves actually spend a few hours being ICY COLD before the heat sets in? Many horse owner never experience this as it’s short lived. You can significantly slow or stop the chemical triggers that cause laminitis. Icing your horse’s laminitis hooves for 24-48 or longer hours physically slows the rate at which the chain reaction of chemicals tells your horse’s feet to inflame. Some protocols are suggesting ice therapy for up to 72 hours. Yes, these are 24-72 hours consistently. Your horse’s hoof shape reflects laminitis. A horse with laminitis grows more heel than front. Perhaps a good reasons to photograph your horse’s feet every time the Farrier is there. Chronic abscesses are a real possibility for the horse that has experienced laminitis. A good way to monitor for a brewing abscess is to know your horse’s baseline digital pulse and monitor it daily. Checking the hooves for heat daily also helps, but is a bit more subjective than the pulse. Laminitis is the inflammation of the internal hoof structures. Founder is when the sinking, rotation, or other change to the position of the bones inside the hoof. Both are horribly painful. Daily attention to your horse’s legs, hooves, and overall health go a long way to preventing laminitis.

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The Types of Laminitis - With Video from Dr. James Orsini

The Types of Laminitis - With Video from Dr. James Orsini

October 28, 2021 |

The Four Main Categories of Laminitis in the Horse Laminitis isn’t the same for all horses, and those differences can lead to more instances of laminitis occurring. What we do know is that there are lots of reasons for laminitis to affect a horse, and those reasons can be boiled down to four categories: An inflammatory disease process. Systemic illnesses create a sudden laminitis as the horse’s body goes into a state of systemic inflammation. This can happen after a colic, a case of pneumonia, a retained placenta, and the like. Metabolic disorders. Horses with PPID (Cushing’s Disease), Insulin Resistance, and other metabolic conditions are at a higher risk of laminitis than other horses. Age is not a factor here, but diet and exercise can be. Severe lameness, infection, or fracture in one limb can cause supporting limb laminitis. A horse will favor the injured leg, transferring weight and stress to the healthy limb which ultimately leads to laminitis in the healthy leg. Repetitive trauma, such as road founder, is also a cause of laminitis. In cases like this, a single incident can be the culprit, or it can develop over time from the repetition of work. Hard surfaces are often involved Ice Horse is fortunate to have Dr. James Orsini of the New Bolton Center, a leading laminitis expert, on our panel of distinguished professional experts. Dr. Orsini received his DVM from Cornell University in 1977 and completed his subsequent internship, residency and fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center before joining the faculty. He is currently an Associate Professor of Surgery at Penn's School of Veterinary Medicine. Along with his expertise in laminitis, Dr. Orsini has also published extensively on equine pediatric surgery, antimicrobials, gastric ulcers, pain and anti-inflammatory medications and related fields. Watch the video below for Dr. Orsini's explanation of the types of laminitis in horses. Enjoy!

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What to do if you suspect laminitis

What to do if you suspect laminitis

October 26, 2021 |

What To Do If You Suspect Laminitis Not all hoof injuries and conditions are laminitis, but many possibilities look the same, and might feel the same, to your horse. Any time a horse has soreness, lameness, heat in the hooves, or you suspect a hoof issue, please consult your Veterinarian for a treatment plan. We had the amazing opportunity to chat with Dr. James Orsini, of the New Bolton Center, about laminitis.Often, in the case of laminitis, you might find the following signs:- Reluctance to walk- Strong digital pulse at the fetlock- Heat in the hoof- Reluctance to turn- A parked out stance to take pressure from the front hooves- Lameness It could be laminitis, but it could also be something else! Either way, your horse is hurting. There are a few easy steps to take to relieve the pain and work towards a diagnosis. - Ice your horse’s hooves. - Call your Veterinarian. - Give anti-inflammatory medications if your Veterinarian directs you to. Both ice and anti-inflammatory medications are great pain relievers and will help your horse be more comfortable until the Vet can arrive. In some cases, your Veterinarian may suggest holding off on medications until a full exam can be done. Every case will be different, but having the proper supplies on hand is the first step to keeping your horse healthy. Listen below to renowned laminitis expert Dr. James Orsini discusses these steps!

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The horse with laminitis - risk factors, signs, and finding the underlying issue. With Video!

The horse with laminitis - risk factors, signs, and finding the underlying issue. With Video!

October 13, 2021 |

Laminitis: Risk Factors, Signs & Finding the Cause How does the horse owner know a horse is developing laminitis? It’s critical to also understand the risk factors involved here, and laminitis has quite a few. Metabolic issues such as Cushing’s Disease or Insulin Resistance play a role. So does your horse’s job - does he have repetitive motion on a hard surface? What about your horse’s medical history - has he had laminitis in the past? There are other risk factors as well, including your horse’s weight, breed, gender. Overweight horses are more at risk, as are geldings and ponies. There’s also the cases of the horse developing laminitis from a fever or secondary to some disease, even secondary to colic. Then you need to keep your eyes peeled for the signs of laminitis - including lameness, an increased digital pulse, reluctance to walk or turn, the parked out stance, and even what appears to be mild colic. Once your Veterinarian is involved, which should happen right away, then you can go about finding the underlying cause of laminitis in order to prevent further episodes and stop laminitis from being chronic. The Ice Horse team interviewed leading laminitis expert Dr. James Orsini from the New Bolton Center in Pennsylvania, this is what he shared with us!

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Ice Horse Discusses Laminitis with Dr. James Orsini - the full video!

Ice Horse Discusses Laminitis with Dr. James Orsini - the full video!

October 11, 2021 |

Ice Horse Discusses Laminitis with Dr. James Orsini - the Full Video! Dr. James Orsini, a leading laminitis expert at the New Bolton Center, shares with Ice Horse a little bit about his career and a lot about laminitis. Listen below as Dr. Orsini discusses the role an owner plays, what to do if you suspect laminitis, the different types of laminitis, and the chances of laminitis becoming recurrent or chronic. Lots of great information!

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Sore Muscles in Horses - What Causes Them and What To Do!

Sore Muscles in Horses - What Causes Them and What To Do!

October 09, 2021 |

An Introduction to Sore Muscles in Horses The staff at Ice Horse is well-versed in the kinds of injury and disease that a horse may have, yet little attention is paid in the broader community to the ailments of a horse's muscles. Just like humans, horses can have debilitating issues and situations that involve their muscles. Ultimately, it’s up to you and your Veterinarian to figure things out for the good of your horse. Muscle Issues in Horses Typically Arise from 4 Scenarios: - Secondary to an illness or sickness, such as neurological or metabolic disorders. For example, Cushing’s disease is a metabolic disorder that can reduce weight and muscle mass. Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a microbe infection that affects the nervous system and muscles. - Tying up. This is commonly a metabolic condition that creates pain, excessive sweating, and the inability to move. Conditions such as polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) create tying up. Additionally, a horse that is dehydrated and has lost electrolytes can lead to tying up. This commonly occurs in unfit and overworked horses. - Exercise and stress related exertions. Overwork, repetitive motions, and smaller muscle strains that happen repeatedly all take their toll on your horse’s muscles. This can also be secondary to skeletal issues, such as a horse with sore hind joints that compensates with a stiff and strained back. Poor saddle fit also falls into this category. - Trauma. Just as bones and ligaments can be injured, muscles can as well. A deep laceration, a night spent cast in the stall, a fall, a kick from a herd mate and more can all damage the muscle.  So How Do You Know? Look for signs of soreness when you groom your horse. Flinching, tail wringing and pinning ears as you press and tack up are often signs. Your horse might also be reluctant to move forward to perform certain gaits. You might find a decrease in range of motion, lameness, tender skin, swelling, a dent in your horse or overall discomfort somewhere in the body. Of course there are many other signs, and all of these things could also be something else. Get the Vet on board and start doing some investigating. What Can You Do? Once you and your Vet narrow things down, the care plan might include rest, medications, a diet change, and even some therapeutic treatments like massage and cold or hot therapy. You might need to change saddles, create a new exercise routine, or give your horse some supplements. The most important part is noticing something is off in the first place.

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How to Reduce the Risk of Spring Time Laminitis

How to Reduce the Risk of Spring Time Laminitis

October 06, 2021 |

How to Reduce the Risk of Spring Time Laminitis! Caring for horses in the spring comes with one big challenge - the lush pastures. While horses love them, spring time pastures are often associated with laminitis. As the days lengthen, the sun tells grasses and plants to rev up photosynthesis. This increases the starches, sugars, and fructans of grasses. The cool nights of spring also increase the starches, sugars, and fructans. These ingredients make spring grass delicious, and laminitis inducing. There’s a wide array of scientific research that links large amounts of sugar intake to laminitis risk. As the sugars enter the large colon, they are feasted up by your horse’s microbial population, which changes the pH of the large colon. The change in pH causes the intestinal wall to permeate and leak digestive toxins, which migrate to the hoof. There is also loads of scientific evidence that links increased insulin levels to laminitis, as the insulin interferes with the soft tissue in the hoof, making it more likely to develop into laminitis.  So What Can You Do? Have your Vet give your horse a complete physical, including bloodwork. There are specific tests available to monitor insulin levels as well as the other factors that make up the different types of metabolic conditions. Knowing if your horse has a metabolic issue can help you create a diet that is safe. Monitor the weight of your horse. Use a tape - your eyes are deceiving! Horses that gain weight put more stress on their legs and hooves, and have an increased chance of metabolic issues. Keep exercising your horse! This is crucial for his health, and can help you keep your horse healthy. And it’s fun! Monitor your horse’s digital pulse daily. It takes seconds to do, and can alert you to a problem in the hoof long before lameness sets in. You can learn how to do this with the handy video, below! Talk to your Vet about a magnesium supplement, which might help with insulin levels. Of course your horse’s entire diet needs to be evaluated, as you don’t want to add too much. Use dry lots or sacrifice areas instead of turning out into grass.  If you must turn out on grass, use muzzles. There are dozens of styles, each with varying degrees of eating freedom. Make sure your horse can drink with one on.  Be smart about turn out to the grass - avoid high sugar times, like after a cool evening or in the heat of the afternoon. Make your turn out gradual. Your Vet can help you decide how many minutes a day to increase the turn out. There have been studies done with horses on a predictable turn out schedule, many of them know how long they will be out and therefore vacuum up as much grass as possible. Observe your horse and add a muzzle if he’s one of the vacuum types. Call your Vet at the first sign of any trouble! This includes an increased digital pulse, heat in the hooves, difficulty turning, unwillingness to walk (especially on hard ground) and any other signs your horse is not his usual self. If you do end up with a case of laminitis, you can use the Laminitis Kit to keep your horse's hooves cold - reducing inflammation and providing some pain relief. Learn more about the laminitis kit here!   Watch the video below for some extra pointers!

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The Hock Joint of the Horse

The Hock Joint of the Horse

October 03, 2021 |

The Hock Joint of the Horse The hock joints of your horse are located on the hind legs just above the cannon bones. They are equivalent to the human ankle. The hock functions to carry weight, push off the earth, and allow your horse to run, jump, turn, and play. The hock joints are such an important joint to all equine athletes, regardless of discipline. The entire hock area is actually made up of bones, joints, ligaments, tendons, and fluid. There are four joints in the hock, four extensor tendons, four collateral ligaments on each side of the hock, and two flexor tendons that run through the hock. The joints are as follows from top to bottom: - TCJ - Tarsocrural joint - PIT - Proximal Intertarsal Joint - DIT - DIgital intertarsal joint - TMT - Tarsometatarsal joint The lower joints can actually fuse over time. They can also be fused with surgery. This is sometimes helpful for the horse with chronic hock soreness, arthritis, or other issues that cause discomfort and poor performance. Many horses experience soreness and changes in the hock joint over time. This is a function of “wear and tear”, injuries, conformation, overall health, fitness level, proper foot care, and even diet. Supporting your horse’s hocks help your athlete stay sound, comfortable, and willing to work. You will be able to notice a few things about your horse’s hocks that give you an idea of how they are feeling. Keep track of: - Size and shape. They should by symmetrical. - Heat and swelling. Any obvious heat and swelling can indicate a new injury. You will likely not be able to discern the heat and swelling that goes along with arthritis and similar “wear and tear” issues. - Any hair loss. This might indicate that he’s brewing a hock sore. - How does your horse walk? Are his steps symmetrical and landing at the same point under his belly? - How does he act under saddle? Sluggishness, unwillingness to work, and refusing jumps might tell you something is wrong somewhere. The same goes for bucking and other naughty behaviors. - How readily does your horse pick up his hind legs to have his hooves picked? You will often see resistance if a horse’s joints are sore. - Is your horse’s back sore? This is a common sign that it’s actually his hocks that are sore. But don’t rule out saddle fit! Joints and soft tissues will become heated and develop inflammation as your horse works. This is the “wear and tear” that over time can contribute to joint soreness. The soft tissues that work hard are also subject to soreness, just as your muscles are sore after a work out. Taking care of our horses means attending to this, and as owners and care takers we have lots of options to support your horse’s hocks and surrounding tissues. Ice therapy in the form of Ice Horse Hock Wraps give proven cold to reduce inflammation and pain. Even if your horse shows no signs of discomfort, icing after riding will help him feel better and recover faster. Always work with your Veterinarian to come up with a plan for your horse’s hock health to keep him a happy athlete for many years.

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The Arthritic Horse

The Arthritic Horse

October 01, 2021 |

Arthritis in Horses Arthritis in horses, also known as degenerative joint disease, is a chronic condition of the horse’s joint or joints. Arthritis is caused by one of two scenarios - the cartilage wears down on the joint surfaces, or there’s an infection in the joint capsule. For the wear and tear variety of arthritis, a horse’s joints will start to have bone scraping bone as the cartilage is worn away. Inflammation and pain is the result. For the septic version of arthritis, an injury or wound has created an infection in the joint capsule. The “wear and tear” type of arthritis in horses often leads to stiffness. As a horse owner and rider, your horse’s gait might be shortened, his back might not swing so well, and he might feel choppy under saddle. Usually a horse will warm up out of this stiffness as your ride progresses. More severe cases of arthritis lead to lameness. You might also be able to feel heat in an arthritic joint, or even be able to see swelling. Of course your Veterinarian should be involved with any condition that you might notice in your horse. Sometimes x-rays are done to get a more exact picture of what’s going on in your horse’s body. There are lots of options of how you can support the horse with arthritis, ranging from diet changes to supplements to joint injections. You can also make sure your horse is not overweight or obese, and keep up with an exercise regime. The horse that doesn’t exercise will find his arthritis getting worse! If he’s sore, he’s apt to use the joint less. This puts additional stress on the other legs and joints, as well as allow calcium deposits to invade the joint, possibly causing fusion and definitely causing lack of mobility. Exercise is key! You can also spend a lot of time warming your horse up. Many arthritic horses do well with a lot of walking, and mane like a little warming pack on their joints before a workout. After exercise, ice therapy can help reduce inflammation and take away any discomfort. It’s easy, and will definitely make your horse feel better.

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The Pre Purchase Exam - What You Might Uncover!

The Pre Purchase Exam - What You Might Uncover!

September 29, 2021 |

The Pre-Purchase Exam - Things You May Want To Ask About Buying a horse is always exciting, and it’s made a little easier when you have your Veterinarian do a Pre Purchase Exam, also known as the PPE. It can give you a lot of information - but there are two things to keep in mind here. One, it’s only a picture of that horse on the day the exam is done. No future predictions can be made! Two, there is no pass or fail. It’s more along the lines of the horse being suitable for what you would like to do.  The PPE is a thorough exam! Your Veterinarian will check vitals, look at the eyes, teeth, and overall body conformation. Then, your Veterinarian will do some flexions and maybe watch the horse go on a lunge line or under saddle. Definitely in both directions, and definitely in a straight line and on a circle. You might decide that you want to do some imaging, like x-rays or ultrasound. This allows your Veterinarian to check on the current health of the horse’s joints and bones in the case of x-rays, soft tissues in the case of ultrasound. These aren’t required, but they help with understanding the overall condition of the horse as well as possibly finding any problems that are not causing lameness right now. Those problems might cause lameness in the future, they might not. You should also ask about a complete medical history, diet and supplements fed, current training program, show records, and anything else the Veterinarian and you might find useful. Some people like to also do blood work to check for sedatives and diseases, and some people like to have a Farrier consult on the horse. Knowing about the horse’s therapeutic treatments also helps, so you can be on the same page as the chiropractor, saddle fitter, massage therapist, etc. A post exercise routine is also handy to know so that you can continue icing, liniments, supplements, turn outs, etc. Enjoy the horse shopping process and work closely with your Veterinarian. Keep your riding goals in mind to be sure your new horse can help take you there!

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How to Take Ice Horse to Horse Shows

How to Take Ice Horse to Horse Shows

September 26, 2021 |

How to Ice Your Horse at Horse Shows, Clinics and Events! It’s fine and dandy to use Ice Horse at the home barn, but what about when you travel? How can you easily bring your packs along AND keep them icy cold? There are a few options - and it’s best to start out with frozen packs so they stay cold at the show. This small freezer is easy to carry and has enough room for popsicles, too. Bring a small freezer with you. These guys are easy to move, small enough to tuck away in your show tack room, and convenient. The small fridge and freezer combo might not get cold enough for your packs, and you might not have enough space for all of them. Best to use just the freezer. Use a cooler. This is a great way to stash your ice packs in something that will keep them cool for a day. This is ideal if they are frozen for at least 4 hours before you head out. Keep the cooler sealed and you will be good. If you use a cooler, you might want to add some solid ice packs to keep things cold. The gel style packs won’t last.  You also have the option of using dry ice to keep things cold. Sometimes it’s a challenge to find dry ice, some supermarkets don’t carry it anymore. You also have some safety concerns with dry ice. Don’t touch it! Be sure to wrap it in newspaper, and you must vent the cooler. As dry ice turns to a gaseous state, it will need to go somewhere. If your cooler is sealed, well, things might pop. Be sure to refreeze the packs before the next day’s use. It’s best to take them out of the black wraps. You will also want the circular valve to be open to the air. This allows air to help with the magic inside the ice pack. This will also keep your ice packs fluffy and fresh longer. Now your horse is set to have his relaxing and therapeutic ice treatments where ever you go! Even the smallest of coolers has plenty of room for many First Ice packs.

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