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Equine Sports Medicine Announces Collaboration with IceHorse

Equine Sports Medicine Announces Collaboration with IceHorse

October 27, 2021 |

Ice Horse Announces New Collaborative Partnership with ESMR Ice Horse is proud to announce its new collaborative partnership with Equine Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation (ESMR). Dedicated to treating the performance horse, ESMR features the professional insight of leading veterinarian Dr. Sherry Johnson, DVM, MS, DACVSMR, alongside her co-owners, Dr. Josh Donnell, DVM, and Dr. Cameron Stoudt, DVM. “Our mission at ESMR is to provide the best, evidence-based veterinary care for actively competing equine athletes and those rehabilitating from orthopedic injuries,” said Johnson. “Our alliances with like-minded industry leaders such as Ice Horse ultimately advance the level of care we can provide.” Ice Horse products allow for targeted cryotherapy for both injury prevention and rehabilitation. The application of Ice Horse leg wraps, back blanket, or hoof boot allows for an efficient, combined approach of cold therapy and compression. This type of cryotherapy plays a critical role in post-exercise recovery, management of chronic inflammation, treatment of injuries, and more. And these effective treatments can be easily administered both at home and on the road. “The anatomic fit of the Ice Horse wraps, boots, and back blanket are the absolute best on the market,” Johnson added. “And the products fit so well, and with excellent insulation, that I’m able to utilize them for both cold and heat therapy for my patients. Nothing compares, in effectiveness and in quality, to Ice Horse.” To further support the soundness and longevity of the performance horse, Ice Horse is working alongside the ESMR veterinarians, to continually refine the existing line of products in addition to working together to create new custom pieces for rehabilitative use. “We’re thrilled to be collaborating with ESMR and Dr. Sherry Johnson,” said Julie Garella, CEO and president of MacKinnon Products, LLC, the parent company of Ice Horse. “Their veterinarian-directed rehabilitation practice is at the forefront of equine sports medicine, which makes for the perfect collaborative partner to use our products.” IceHorse products will be available with ESMR at nationally-sanctioned competitions throughout the year, in addition to keeping them in stock at the ESMR clinic in Pilot Point, Tex., and at the rehabilitation center located in Whitesboro, Tex. For further updates, please follow Ice Horse on Instagram at @icehorse and visit the Ice Horse website at www.icehorse.com and the ESMR website at www.eqsmr.com.

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Hoof Abscess Diagnosis and Care

Hoof Abscess Diagnosis and Care

August 11, 2021 |

How do I tell if my horse has a hoof abscess? The pain of a hoof abscess is usually severe, about 4 on a scale of 5. So if your horse comes out limping or walking on his toe, follow these steps:           1. Run your hand over the sore leg and hoof for signs of injury: Look for cuts, bruises, heat and swelling.           2. Feel the hoof—does it feel warmer than usual or compared to the other feet?           3. Check the pulse near the pastern- does it feel strong and bounding when compared the other leg?           4. Clean and examine the bottom of the hoof for puncture wounds or dark holes on the sole.           5. Look to see if the pastern or heel bulbs and coronary band are swollen. If any of these symptoms are present, call your veterinarian. How do I treat a hoof abscess? The best treatment strategy for a hoof abscess is to open it and let it drain which should be done by a qualified veterinarian. If the horse is shod generally the shoe will be pulled.   Once the shoe is off, hoof testers can be used to help find the location of the abscess.  Whenever possible vets like to drain an abscess through the sole. This method works well for two reasons:  First, the crack or puncture that can lead to an abscess is generally in the sole and can be followed to the abscess. Second, this puts a hole beneath the abscess so gravity can help pull out the pus.   Some abscesses will even pop on their own, often after traveling up the hoof to the coronary band or heel bulbs where the wall is thinner and easier to break through.  Soaking in Epsom salts and applying poultice can also be effective in causing an abscess to break open. After the abscess has broken you want to keep the wound open to continue draining. If the wound closes over at the surface, but infection is still present inside, these are the perfect conditions for an abscess to re-occur. Keep your horse in a clean, dry stall. If you only have turn out, make sure it is clean, dry and not too large. The horse should feel immediate relief by having the abscess drained and the draining process should last 3-4 days. At this stage, the most important thing is to keep the open area clean and dry. In the old days people used duct tape and diapers but Hoof Wraps Brand® has come up with ingenious Hoof Wrap Bandage that is simple to use and will keep your horse's hoof clean and dry hoof up to 2 weeks. The Hoof Wraps Bandage makes the daily care and cleaning of the drainage opening far easier and less time consuming. Check your bandage and dressing every 25 hours or if you notice it getting loose. While your horse will experience relief within 24 hours, it will take several weeks for the hoof to heal properly. Tips to Avoid Hoof Abscess Keep your stalls and turnouts clean Schedule regular farrier visits Clean muck, mud, sand and debris from hoofs daily Avoid rocky terrain Apply disinfectant like SteriHoof if you suspect an infection is brewing Make sure you're prepared

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This Is Why FEI Event Riders Choose Ice Horse

This Is Why FEI Event Riders Choose Ice Horse

December 12, 2020 |

Ice Horse is Proud to Announce New Team Riders Ice Horse is proud to announce the addition of new team riders, Liz Halliday-Sharp, Caroline Martin, and Sara Kozumplik Murphy. All three riders compete at the international, FEI-level for Three-Day Eventing and utilize Ice Horse products to provide the best cold therapy for their respective strings. “Ice Horse and Eventing really go hand in hand,” said Julie, Ice Horse CEO and owner. “Ice Horse cold therapy products are clinically proven to stay colder longer and to cool inflammation better than any other equine cold therapy option. From dressage to cross-country to stadium jumping, the Eventing sport demands a lot from the horses’ bodies and legs, and there’s no better way to maintain, or treat, soundness than with consistent application of Ice Horse products.” Liz Halliday-Sharp Caroline Martin Sara Kozumplik Murphy Liz Halliday-Sharp agrees on the importance of cold therapy for her horses. Keeping her horses sound is a key factor in achieving her accomplished record, which includes winning the 2020 U.S. Eventing Rider of the Year title in addition to landing on the top of the international leaderboard with the most FEI wins in 2020. Halliday-Sharp is a favorite to make the U.S. team for the Tokyo Olympics in 2021. “I absolutely love the Ice Horse products for my horses,” said Halliday-Sharp. “The Cold Capsule inserts are secured easily with velcro, and they stay in place on the horses’ legs. The Ice Horse boots are great for the young horses that may get nervous standing in big boots or tubs, and the upper-level horses benefit from Ice Horse’s superior coverage.” “It is so hard to keep most ice products cold, but I have never had a problem with these.” Halliday-Sharp added. “And the Cold Capsule inserts are small enough that they fit in freezers or coolers for no-hassle transport when we are on the road. Ice Horse is absolutely what I would recommend for horses for all levels and needs.” Halliday-Sharp’s most-used Ice Horse products for her string are the Ice Horse Tendon Wraps (starting at $59.95). Caroline Martin is another well-known name in the sport, having earned multiple titles and championships as a young rider. She was also named to the U.S. Developing Rider and Team Training lists every year for nearly a decade. And at the young age of 26, Martin has already represented the country in multiple international team competitions and is shortlisted for the upcoming Olympic Games. “I’m so amazed with Ice Horse products,” Martin said. “I had been searching for a product to use when our horses finish a jump school or a gallop that would actually stay cold on their legs, without making them nervous. I also struggled to find a product that would stay in difficult areas like hocks and stifles. “Ice Horse wraps stay in place, are easy to use, and don’t spook the horses. Horses can move around all they want in Ice Horse, including on hauls home after local events or on walks back to the barns after cross-country. “Best of all, the Cold Capsule inserts actually stay cold and secured on the horses, no matter what. With a busy import sales business, I feel the Ice Horse products are also the perfect introduction for young horses, especially 4-year-olds, into icing. Ice Horse helps my horses feel their best and gives me the peace of mind that I’m doing everything I can for their soundness.” In addition to the leg wraps, Martin likes to utilize the Ice Horse Back Blanket ($169.95) to relieve any back soreness. The Back Blanket can also be used with heat inserts for heat therapy. Sara Kozumplik Murphy is an international competitor in both Eventing and in Show Jumping. Additionally, she is a well-respected and sought-after coach and horse trainer and is known for producing quality horses. “Ice Horse was the solution after a long search for effective cold therapy,” said Kozumplik Murphy. “For years prior, our busy, professional barn grew tired of using cumbersome and substandard equipment to ice our horses’ legs after galloping and jumping. We needed an alternative solution that was effective, practical, and not time-consuming—which is exactly what Ice Horse offers. “Ice Horse leg, body, and hoof care are designed to offer the best combination of compression and cold therapy to reduce inflammation. Not only are the Ice Horse products easy to use, but I noticed a huge difference in the coolness and tightness of my horses’ legs after using Ice Horse. Gone are the days of ice packs melting or boots slipping because Ice Horse doesn’t move and its Cold Capsules stay freezing cold for hours.” “These products are so easy to use that anyone at any level can effectively and confidently use Ice Horse without supervision,” Kozumplik Murphy added. “We now haul our horses home from local events wearing various Ice Horse products. These products are a game-changer for our program.” Kozumplik Murphy finds the Ice Horse Hock Wraps (starting at $79.95) to be helpful in icing an area that would otherwise be difficult to treat. Ice Horse is proud to sponsor these three, exceptional athletes. They join the Ice Horse team that includes other top, international Eventers such as Lauren Kieffer and Buck Davidson.

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Ice Horse Behind the Scenes at World Equestrian Games

September 26, 2018 |

Ice Horse Behind the Scenes at World Equestrian Games Sharon Classen served as one of the International Equestrian Federation’s few “Permitted Equine Therapists” at the World Equestrian Games this past week. Her WEG role included helping competitors from across the globe who are not able to bring their own physical therapist. Sharon worked with the American reining team, the Bolivian show jumpers, the Irish Eventers and Para Dressage pairs. Sharon trusts Ice Horse cryotherapy when treating her high-performance clients. "Here at WEG using Ice Horse ice packs to treat the athletes... the ice packs are excellent and helping to keep these athletes performing to their best- love them!" - Sharon Classen, Permitted Equine Therapist Ice Horse Riders Represented at WEG Jumpers Earn Gold An impressive jump round by Ice Horse Rider Laura Kraut and Zeremonie helped the US Team win gold for the first time in 32 years! 🇺🇸 🏅 Driving to Victory Ice Horse Driver, Chester Weber, and the U.S. team secured their first ever gold medal. Chester also received an Individual Silver in Combined Driving! Reining Supreme Congratulations are in order for Cade McCutcheon and everyone at Tom McCutcheon Reining Horses for the winning the gold medal! 🏅 We are thrilled to be a part of their team! Congratulations to all our riders! #betterbymiles

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Windpuffs and Horses

Windpuffs and Horses

May 29, 2018 |

What is a Windpuff? A windpuff is a soft and squishy blemish found on a horse’s lower leg. Generally speaking, windpuffs are just a blemish. Occasionally, a windpuff will cause pain and lameness. You will typically find them around the back of the fetlock joint. This is the point of your horse’s anatomy that the digital flexor tendons wrap under the fetlock on their way to the hoof. The tendons themselves are covered with a tendon sheath. Between the tendon and the tendon sheath is a layer of fluid. If the tendon sheath is damaged, the amount of fluid may increase. This creates a swelling, or windpuff. The amount of fluid in the windpuff will vary, generally going up and down with your horse’s movement patterns. Most windpuffs are chronic, and never truly go away. There’s another scenario where the windpuff is caught in the annular ligament, which goes around the fetlock. This ligament is flat and thin, and causes a pinching. In this case, your horse will be uncomfortable. This may be treated with injections. Your horse might also develop adhesions between the tendon and the tendon sheath. In cases like this, arthroscopy surgery inside the sheath can cut the adhesions, or in some cases, ligaments that are interfering. As a horse owner, look for new things on your horse. Look for swelling, feel for heat. Notice differences in your horse’s legs, and investigate lamenesses right away. Windpuffs are generally old and cold. They usually develop over time and don’t interfere with your horse’s comfort and movement. You might also have a case in which the windpuff which is usually cold and small, has quickly become large. This is another reason to investigate. Daily attention to your horse’s legs is critical! You can catch lots of things early, and keep your horse safe and sound.

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How to Take Ice Horse to Horse Shows

How to Take Ice Horse to Horse Shows

May 23, 2018 |

How to Ice Your Horse at Horse Shows, Clinics and Events! It’s fine and dandy to use Ice Horse at the home barn, but what about when you travel? How can you easily bring your packs along AND keep them icy cold? There are a few options - and it’s best to start out with frozen packs so they stay cold at the show. This small freezer is easy to carry and has enough room for popsicles, too. Bring a small freezer with you. These guys are easy to move, small enough to tuck away in your show tack room, and convenient. The small fridge and freezer combo might not get cold enough for your packs, and you might not have enough space for all of them. Best to use just the freezer. Use a cooler. This is a great way to stash your ice packs in something that will keep them cool for a day. This is ideal if they are frozen for at least 4 hours before you head out. Keep the cooler sealed and you will be good. If you use a cooler, you might want to add some solid ice packs to keep things cold. The gel style packs won’t last.  You also have the option of using dry ice to keep things cold. Sometimes it’s a challenge to find dry ice, some supermarkets don’t carry it anymore. You also have some safety concerns with dry ice. Don’t touch it! Be sure to wrap it in newspaper, and you must vent the cooler. As dry ice turns to a gaseous state, it will need to go somewhere. If your cooler is sealed, well, things might pop. Be sure to refreeze the packs before the next day’s use. It’s best to take them out of the black wraps. You will also want the circular valve to be open to the air. This allows air to help with the magic inside the ice pack. This will also keep your ice packs fluffy and fresh longer. Now your horse is set to have his relaxing and therapeutic ice treatments where ever you go! Even the smallest of coolers has plenty of room for many First Ice packs.

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The Pre Purchase Exam - What You Might Uncover!

The Pre Purchase Exam - What You Might Uncover!

April 19, 2018 |

The Pre-Purchase Exam - Things You May Want To Ask About Buying a horse is always exciting, and it’s made a little easier when you have your Veterinarian do a Pre Purchase Exam, also known as the PPE. It can give you a lot of information - but there are two things to keep in mind here. One, it’s only a picture of that horse on the day the exam is done. No future predictions can be made! Two, there is no pass or fail. It’s more along the lines of the horse being suitable for what you would like to do.  The PPE is a thorough exam! Your Veterinarian will check vitals, look at the eyes, teeth, and overall body conformation. Then, your Veterinarian will do some flexions and maybe watch the horse go on a lunge line or under saddle. Definitely in both directions, and definitely in a straight line and on a circle. You might decide that you want to do some imaging, like x-rays or ultrasound. This allows your Veterinarian to check on the current health of the horse’s joints and bones in the case of x-rays, soft tissues in the case of ultrasound. These aren’t required, but they help with understanding the overall condition of the horse as well as possibly finding any problems that are not causing lameness right now. Those problems might cause lameness in the future, they might not. You should also ask about a complete medical history, diet and supplements fed, current training program, show records, and anything else the Veterinarian and you might find useful. Some people like to also do blood work to check for sedatives and diseases, and some people like to have a Farrier consult on the horse. Knowing about the horse’s therapeutic treatments also helps, so you can be on the same page as the chiropractor, saddle fitter, massage therapist, etc. A post exercise routine is also handy to know so that you can continue icing, liniments, supplements, turn outs, etc. Enjoy the horse shopping process and work closely with your Veterinarian. Keep your riding goals in mind to be sure your new horse can help take you there!

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The Arthritic Horse

The Arthritic Horse

March 20, 2018 |

Arthritis in Horses     Arthritis in horses, also known as degenerative joint disease, is a chronic condition of the horse’s joint or joints.  Arthritis is caused by one of two scenarios - the cartilage wears down on the joint surfaces, or there’s an infection in the joint capsule.  For the wear and tear variety of arthritis, a horse’s joints will start to have bone scraping bone as the cartilage is worn away.  Inflammation and pain is the result.  For the septic version of arthritis, an injury or wound has created an infection in the joint capsule.   The “wear and tear” type of arthritis in horses often leads to stiffness.  As a horse owner and rider, your horse’s gait might be shortened, his back might not swing so well, and he might feel choppy under saddle.  Usually a horse will warm up out of this stiffness as your ride progresses.     More severe cases of arthritis lead to lameness.  You might also be able to feel heat in an arthritic joint, or even be able to see swelling.    Of course your Veterinarian should be involved with any condition that you might notice in your horse.  Sometimes x-rays are done to get a more exact picture of what’s going on in your horse’s body.   There are lots of options of how you can support the horse with arthritis, ranging from diet changes to supplements to joint injections.  You can also make sure your horse is not overweight or obese, and keep up with an exercise regime.  The horse that doesn’t exercise will find his arthritis getting worse!  If he’s sore, he’s apt to use the joint less.  This puts additional stress on the other legs and joints, as well as allow calcium deposits to invade the joint, possibly causing fusion and definitely causing lack of mobility. Exercise is key!   You can also spend a lot of time warming your horse up. Many arthritic horses do well with a lot of walking, and mane like a little warming pack on their joints before a workout.  After exercise, ice therapy can help reduce inflammation and take away any discomfort.  It’s easy, and will definitely make your horse feel better.     

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The Hock Joint of the Horse

The Hock Joint of the Horse

March 12, 2018 |

The Hock Joint of the Horse!   The hock joints of your horse are located on the hind legs just above the cannon bones.  They are equivalent to the human ankle.  The hock functions to carry weight, push off the earth, and allow your horse to run, jump, turn, and play.  The hock joints are such an important joint to all equine athletes, regardless of discipline.      The entire hock area is actually made up of bones, joints, ligaments, tendons, and fluid.  There are four joints in the hock, four extensor tendons, four collateral ligaments on each side of the hock, and two flexor tendons that run through the hock.    The joints are as follows from top to bottom:  TCJ - Tarsocrural joint   PIT - Proximal Intertarsal Joint   DIT - DIgital intertarsal joint   TMT - Tarsometatarsal joint   The lower joints can actually fuse over time. They can also be fused with surgery.  This is sometimes helpful for the horse with chronic hock soreness, arthritis, or other issues that cause discomfort and poor performance.    Many horses experience soreness and changes in the hock joint over time.  This is a function of “wear and tear”, injuries, conformation, overall health, fitness level, proper foot care, and even diet.  Supporting your horse’s hocks help your athlete stay sound, comfortable, and willing to work.       You will be able to notice a few things about your horse’s hocks that give you an idea of how they are feeling.  Keep track of: Size and shape.  They should by symmetrical.   Heat and swelling.  Any obvious heat and swelling can indicate a new injury.  You will likely not be able to discern the heat and swelling that goes along with arthritis and similar “wear and tear” issues.    Any hair loss.  This might indicate that he’s brewing a hock sore.  How does your horse walk?  Are his steps symmetrical and landing at the same point under his belly?      How does he act under saddle?  Sluggishness, unwillingness to work, and refusing jumps might tell you something is wrong somewhere.  The same goes for bucking and other naughty behaviors.   How readily does your horse pick up his hind legs to have his hooves picked?  You will often see resistance if a horse’s joints are sore.      Is your horse’s back sore?  This is a common sign that it’s actually his hocks that are sore.  But don’t rule out saddle fit!   Joints and soft tissues will become heated and develop inflammation as your horse works.  This is the “wear and tear” that over time can contribute to joint soreness.  The soft tissues that work hard are also subject to soreness, just as your muscles are sore after a work out.  Taking care of our horses means attending to this, and as owners and care takers we have lots of options to support your horse’s hocks and surrounding tissues.       Ice therapy in the form of Ice Horse Hock Wraps give proven cold to reduce inflammation and pain.  Even if your horse shows no signs of discomfort, icing after riding will help him feel better and recover faster.     Always work with your Veterinarian to come up with a plan for your horse’s hock health to keep him a happy athlete for many years.    

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How to Reduce the Risk of Spring Time Laminitis

How to Reduce the Risk of Spring Time Laminitis

March 06, 2018 |

How to Reduce the Risk of Spring Time Laminitis! Caring for horses in the spring comes with one big challenge - the lush pastures. While horses love them, spring time pastures are often associated with laminitis. As the days lengthen, the sun tells grasses and plants to rev up photosynthesis. This increases the starches, sugars, and fructans of grasses. The cool nights of spring also increase the starches, sugars, and fructans. These ingredients make spring grass delicious, and laminitis inducing. There’s a wide array of scientific research that links large amounts of sugar intake to laminitis risk. As the sugars enter the large colon, they are feasted up by your horse’s microbial population, which changes the pH of the large colon. The change in pH causes the intestinal wall to permeate and leak digestive toxins, which migrate to the hoof. There is also loads of scientific evidence that links increased insulin levels to laminitis, as the insulin interferes with the soft tissue in the hoof, making it more likely to develop into laminitis.  So What Can You Do? Have your Vet give your horse a complete physical, including bloodwork. There are specific tests available to monitor insulin levels as well as the other factors that make up the different types of metabolic conditions. Knowing if your horse has a metabolic issue can help you create a diet that is safe. Monitor the weight of your horse. Use a tape - your eyes are deceiving! Horses that gain weight put more stress on their legs and hooves, and have an increased chance of metabolic issues. Keep exercising your horse! This is crucial for his health, and can help you keep your horse healthy. And it’s fun! Monitor your horse’s digital pulse daily. It takes seconds to do, and can alert you to a problem in the hoof long before lameness sets in. You can learn how to do this with the handy video, below! Talk to your Vet about a magnesium supplement, which might help with insulin levels. Of course your horse’s entire diet needs to be evaluated, as you don’t want to add too much. Use dry lots or sacrifice areas instead of turning out into grass.  If you must turn out on grass, use muzzles. There are dozens of styles, each with varying degrees of eating freedom. Make sure your horse can drink with one on.  Be smart about turn out to the grass - avoid high sugar times, like after a cool evening or in the heat of the afternoon. Make your turn out gradual. Your Vet can help you decide how many minutes a day to increase the turn out. There have been studies done with horses on a predictable turn out schedule, many of them know how long they will be out and therefore vacuum up as much grass as possible. Observe your horse and add a muzzle if he’s one of the vacuum types. Call your Vet at the first sign of any trouble! This includes an increased digital pulse, heat in the hooves, difficulty turning, unwillingness to walk (especially on hard ground) and any other signs your horse is not his usual self. If you do end up with a case of laminitis, you can use the Laminitis Kit to keep your horse's hooves cold - reducing inflammation and providing some pain relief. Learn more about the laminitis kit here!   Watch the video below for some extra pointers!

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Sore Muscles in Horses - What Causes Them and What To Do!

Sore Muscles in Horses - What Causes Them and What To Do!

February 13, 2018 |

An introduction into sore muscles!      We are well versed in all sorts of injuries and diseases that horses may have, yet not much attention is paid to the muscles of a horse.  Just like humans, horses can have issues and situations that involve muscles, it’s up to you and your Veterinarian to figure things out.  Muscle issues in horses arise from four scenarios:   Secondary to an illness or sickness, such as neurological or metabolic disorders.  For example, Cushing’s disease is a metabolic disorder that can reduce weight and muscle mass.  Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a microbe infection that affects the nervous system and muscles.      Tying up.  This is commonly a metabolic condition that creates pain, excessive sweating, and the inability to move all at the same time.  Conditions such as polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) create tying up.  Additionally, there are cases in which a horse is dehydrated and has lost electrolytes which leads to tying up.  This is common for the unfit horse that is asked to work beyond his means.   Exercise and stress related exertions.  Over work, repetitive motions, and smaller muscles strains that happen repeatedly all take their toll on your horse’s muscles.  This can also be secondary to skeletal issues, such as the horse with the sore hind joints that compensates with a stiff and strained back.  You could also put poor saddle fit into this category.   Trauma.  Just as bones and ligaments can be injured, muscles can as well.  A deep laceration, a night spent cast in the stall, a fall, a kick from a herd mate can all damage the muscle.      So how do you know?    Look for signs of soreness when you groom your horse.  Flinching, tail wringing, pinning ears as you press and tack up is one sign.  You might also find a reluctance to move forward to perform certain gaits.  You might find a decrease in range of motion, lameness, tender skin, swelling, a dent in your horse or overall discomfort somewhere in his body.  Of course there are many other signs, and all of these things could also be something else.  Get the Vet on board and start doing some investigating.   Use your fingers and hands to check for muscle flinching as you groom!   What can you do?   Once you and your Vet narrow things down, the care plan might include rest, medications, a diet change, and even some therapeutic treatments like massage and cold or hot therapy.  You might need to change saddles, create a new exercise routine, or give your horse some supplements.  The most important part is noticing something is off in the first place.    

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New University Research Proves Ice Horse Hoof Boots Effective

February 07, 2018 |

    Objectives: Digital cryotherapy is commonly used for laminitis prophylaxis and treatment. Currently validated methods for distal limb cryotherapy involve wet application or compression technology. There is a need for a practical, affordable, dry cryotherapy method that effectively cools the digit. The objective of this study was to evaluate the hoof wall surface temperatures (HWSTs) achieved with a novel dry cryotherapy technology.   Design: Repeated-measures in vivo experimental study. Setting: Experimental intervention at a single site. Participants 6 systemically healthy horses (3 mares, 3 geldings). Interventions Cryotherapy was applied to six horses for eight hours with a commercially available rubber and rubber and welded fabricice boot, which extended proximally to include the foot and pastern. Reusable malleable cold therapy packs were secured against the foot and pastern with the three built-in hook-and-loop fastener panels. Primary and secondary outcome measures HWST and pastern surface temperature of the cryotherapy-treated limb, HWST of the control limb and ambient temperature were recorded every five minutes throughout the study period. Results: Results were analysed with mixed-effects multivariable regression analysis. The HWST (median 11.1°C, interquartile range 8.6°C–14.7°C) in the cryotherapy-treated limb was significantly decreased compared with the control limb (median 29.7°C, interquartile range 28.9°C–30.4°C) (P≤0.001). Cryotherapy limb HWST reached a minimum of 6.75°C (median) with an interquartile range of 4.1°C–9.3°C. Minimum HWST was achieved 68 minutes after cryotherapy pack application. Conclusions: Dry application of cryotherapy significantly reduced HWST and reached minimums below the therapeutic target of 10°C. This cryotherapy method might offer an effective alternative for digital cooling. Read Full Article  

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